Sprouted Wheat Sour Dough Artisan Bread

Sprouted Wheat Sour Dough Artisan Bread

        

In April I wrote about making artisan bread and I just wanted to update you on my progress. I am working on sprouted wheat sour dough artisan bread, with pretty good results. It is more challenging but much more nutritious than using processed flour.
I soak about a 1 1/2 to 2 cups of wheat seeds in water for 24 hours. I then drain them and let them set in a lightly covered bowl, rinsing twice a day, until they have at least a nice quarter inch sprout. I often sprout them for 3 days, at which time the sprout is at least 1/3 of an inch.
Once sprouted I put 3 cups of sprouted berries in my Vita Mixer with 1 1/2 cups of water, and process them until I have a nice, smooth batter. Pour in a bowl and add 2 cups of flour, a quarter cup of sour dough starter, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon yeast (activated in a little warm water), and 2 teaspoons salt. This will be a very wet dough – called a sponge – not thick enough to be able to shape a loaf yet.
I set this all aside for 6 to 12 hours, depending on how sour I want the bread to be, then I toss this on a floured bread board and add enough flour to be able to create a soft loaf. This can be a fair amount of flour – at least a cup. Place in a bowl (2 if you want smaller loaves) lined with parchment paper, cover, and let rise for about 1 1/2 hours, or until at least double in size.
Preheat a dutch oven in a 425 degree oven for a half hour. Place the parchment loaf in the pan and bake covered for a half hour. Take the lid off and bake for 10 to 15 minutes, until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Please note – I have also baked this at 350 degrees for an hour, lid on, with good results.
This is a fairly moist bread and heavier in texture than the standard sour dough artisan loaf, but absolutely delicious. If you try it let me know how it comes out.
Ready to go after wheat berries are sprouted for a few days and put in blender
Making the sponge
First rise – the longer you leave it the more sour it will be
Adding flour to sponge
…enough flour to get a nice, soft dough ball
Sometimes I divide the dough in half to get a couple of smaller loaves, and sometimes I like one big loaf
I like to use this enameled cast iron dutch oven for baking my bread
Warm from the oven and ready to eat!